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Health Equity Corporate Office Building

The new Health Equity Corporate Office Building is an impressive four-story, class "A" office building located on a plateau overlooking the Salt Lake Valley. The structure has an abundance of floor to ceiling glazing with an aesthetic glass to wall ratio that exceeds other office spaces of its kind. The utilization of the glass provides an abundance of natural light and takes advantage of the surrounding mountain and valley views. Decorative composite metal fins were used around the entry building's full height and at the corners of the building. The corners bays of the building utilize spandrel glass at each level in conjunction with large openings and cantilevered wall elements to allow for butt glazing at the corner windows. These elements give the 120,000 square foot structure transparency and lightness, so it appears to be constructed with steel; however, it is a reinforced concrete structure. The building's architecture had to complement the somewhat dated, existing structures on the site. Though the original buildings had small, uninviting punched windows, the owners and city allowed us to provide larger spandrel glass windows for a sleek, dignified look. We achieved a fine-tuned balance between a contemporary style and the existing architecture that allowed us to replicate the similar massing and color scheme of surrounding structures, while also bringing an attractive and modern touch to the site's landscape. The reinforcing ratio used in the walls provides the strength to lift all 30 of the 60-foot panels and enables them to resist wind and seismic forces, even though they are only 12 inches thick. This reinforcement also provides water-tight concrete. Furthermore, the concrete has excellent durability and mold-resistance, along with thermal, fire-resistant, and sound mitigating properties. The tilt-up method is an innovative form of construction that increases crew safety, reduces the construction schedule, and cuts costs by 20% compared to steel construction. The wind resistance and safety aspects of this tilt-up project were incredibly crucial because of wind conditions on-site, which were upwards of 70+ miles per hour. Everyone involved took extra precautions and careful, informed action to prevent any accidents or wall breakage during the lifting process. Initially, the building design had temporary bracing located around the exterior of the structure, utilizing helical piers. However, the site's hillside had subgrade bedrock, preventing the use of the helical piers. The only solution was to brace the walls to the interior floor slab, making it the first four-story tilt-up concrete class "A" office building constructed in Utah to do so. However, this form of bracing would make it nearly impossible to place the structural steel for the floors. Stout Building Contractors, along with AE URBIA, devised and designed a bracing plan that allowed the top floor to be erected first. Once the 4th level floor was constructed, the interior bracing was removed. Then the remaining floors and roof were constructed. This method of bracing reduced the shoring schedule, saving valuable time and money, while also blazing a new trail for future tilt-up projects.  
Main banner image for Health Equity Corporate Office Building

Project Location

Draper, UT
United States

Project Images

TILT-UP TODAY MAGAZINE / PROJECTS IN THE NEWS

Project Team (TCA Members)

Suppliers:
 
Photographer(s):
Olivia Clemons
Mike Ramsey

Project Specifics

Project Category:
Office
Building Types:
Office
Finishes:
Concrete (Polished)
Paint (Flat)
Features:
Embedded Items
Metal Panels
Insulation:
Uninsulated
Environmental:
Number of Floors:
4
Number of Panels:
30 panels
Tilt-Up Wall Area:
31,383 sq ft (2,915 sq m)
Total Floor Area:
120,112 sq ft (11,158 sq m)
Project Footprint:
30,028 sq ft (2,790 sq m)
Tallest Panel:
67 ft 8 in (20.62 m)
Largest Panel:
1,439 sq ft (133.7 sq m)
Heaviest Panel:
209,100 lbs (94,846 kg)